What Makes Vietnamese food special?


We give you a unique inside view to the traditional style of Vietnamese cooking, renowned for its combination of 5 taste senses and use of the freshest local ingredients, making it the best and healthiest cuisine in the world ...Read more

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WHAT MAKES VIETNAMESE FOOD SPECIAL

We give you a unique inside view to the traditional style of Vietnamese cooking, renowned for its combination of 5 taste senses and use of the freshest local ingredients, making it the best and healthiest cuisine in the world.

Vietnamese cuisine encompasses the foods and beverages of Vietnam, and features a combination of five fundamental taste elements in the overall meal. Each Vietnamese dish has a distinctive flavour which reflects one or more of these elements. Common ingredients include fish sauce, shrimp paste, soy sauce, rice, fresh herbs, and fruits and vegetables. Vietnamese recipes use lemongrass, ginger, mint, Vietnamese mint, long coriander, Saigon cinnamon, chilli, lime, and basil leaves. Traditional Vietnamese cooking is greatly admired for its fresh ingredients, minimal use of oil, and reliance on herbs and vegetables. With the balance between fresh herbs and meats and a selective use of spices to reach a fine taste, Vietnamese food is considered one of the healthiest cuisines worldwide.

Vietnamese dishes also include five types of nutrients: powder, water or liquid, mineral elements, protein and fat. Vietnamese cooks try to have five colours: white (metal), green (wood), yellow (Earth), red (fire) and black (water) in their dishes.

Dishes in Vietnam appeal to gastronomes via five senses: food arrangement attracts eyes, sounds come from crisp ingredients, five spices are detected on the tongue, aromatic ingredients coming mainly from herbs stimulate the nose, and some meals, especially finger food, can be perceived by touching.

The principle of yin and yang is applied in composing a meal in a way that provides a balance that is beneficial for the body. While contrasting texture and flavours are important, the principal primarily concerns the "heating" and "cooling" properties of ingredients. Certain dishes are served in their respective seasons to provide contrasts in temperature and spiciness to the food and environment.